benefits of hydrotherapy

benefits of hydrotherapy

The benefits of hydrotherapy has been well known for thousands of years. But the question as to whether cold is better than hot water, or a mixture of both is best for rejuvenating stressed or painful muscles, is still being debated.

However, a recent study in therapeutic treatments strongly suggests that the answer to the debate is finally pretty clear. And that emerging consensus is in behalf of hot water therapy.

For details on what experts are finding, Best Hot Tubs (Farmingdale/Westbury/Windham, NY) is happy to curate below a blog published by Aqua Magazine last December. It covers information originally published in a New York Times on November 1st.

So! As spring approaches, and you’re lacing up your running shoes — or if you are a frequent visitor to a gym — you’ll want to make note of the best treatment for your sore muscles. There’s also a great testimonial video from a Bullfrog Spas’ user at the end.

 

 

 

By Alice Cunningham (Aqua Magazine)

Sometimes the world brings you a gift. For those of us who advocate hot water wellness, the New York Times gave us an early Christmas present on November 1. In a wonderful article titled “Running a Marathon? Think Hot Tub, Not Ice Bath, Afterward,” the Times describes a recent study at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden that looked into the question of which is better for muscle recuperation after strenuous exercise: icing or hot water immersion?

Researchers had test subjects perform strenuous arm exercises and then compared how well their muscles performed after being iced and then heated. The tests showed conclusively that all of those tested regained muscle strength and endurance far more quickly using heat rather than cold, reporting that “power output” was “markedly better.”

The research further revealed that the suspected reason for the difference was that muscle fibers that are warmed absorb more glycogen, the basic carbohydrate used by muscle tissue, following a work out. According to the Times, the lesson of these findings, published in the Journal of Physiology, seems to be that “warming muscles probably aids in recovery by augmenting the muscles’ uptake of carbohydrates,” says Arthur Cheng, a researcher at the Karolinska Institute, who led the study. The study may not permanently put to rest the question of what’s better for tired muscles, hot or cold, but it certainly strongly points to the notion that if you want to recover from a exercise, taking a soak in hot water might just be the right call.

 

 

Bullfrog Spas with JetPak hydrotherapy

Bullfrog Spas with JetPak hydrotherapy

 

Now if you’re wondering which hot water spa will provide you with the best hydro-therapeutic sessions, here’s a video of a happy Bullfrog Spas customer. In it he shares why he likes his hot tub so much and the benefits of Bullfrog’s interchangeable JetPaks: